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Brian Krogsgard: And keeping track of all of it is really difficult. I come from a development background. You come from a web background. I actually knew who you were in your prior company, which is Leadpages by the way, for anyone listening from the web space.

So how did you transition from building a big company So that's a great question. So to speak to my previous history or what I was doing before this, my first software company was a company called Leadpages that was started in January of From to , we grew that to about 50, paying customers. We raised 38 million in venture capital, hired hundreds of people, had a really good go there.

Something I realized about myself is that I think I cap out at around people in terms of company size and my ability to manage at scale. At some point you're managing people and then you're managing people who manage people and then you're managing the people who manage people who manage people. And I really liked that spot of like between 80 people to people. So perhaps I can scale beyond that with my second software company, but at some point I just kinda went to the board and said, "Hey.

I think we should hire a CEO and I can stay on the board. So I started-. Brian Krogsgard: So you're on the board of Leadpages today and Clay Collins: Exactly, yeah. I'm not going into the office and I mean I'm officially chairman of the board, but that's kind of a nice honorary title. I asked for it. Clay Collins: They were nice enough to me. So one of the things that I saw in the marketing tech space, which was really fascinating, was just how a data got So when you first started using marketing tech in the space, someone would use something like Infusionsoft or HubSpot or Salesforce and everything would be in one place.

But then as the space exploded about every single year, the number of martech companies doubled. So folks found themselves sort of originating a place where everything was in their CRM or everything was in their email service provider, to a space where they had to open And then they had information about who attended what webinars in a place like Zoom or GoToWebinar.

And then they had They had payment data in something like Stripe and they had information about what webpages people are visiting in a place like Google Analytics. Clay Collins: And over time, the data just got more and more distributed and it became harder to know what was actually happening in terms of the view of the customer and what they were doing across all these different SAS products that you were using to run your business.

And as that happened, there became a real desire to integrate all these different systems and that became a real challenge.

And at that time, I got really interested in data platforms and customer data platforms where Brian Krogsgard: So essentially, you have your customers in all these different places and then the hard part is saying, "Well this singular customer data over here and this singular customer data over here, we want to bring those together so we can get the profile of who this customer was, both in terms of what they've bought.

But also how they've interacted with our website or app. And then also like how they treat our emails and stuff. Clay Collins: Yeah, yeah. What pages they visited, what emails they've opened, what webinars they've attended, what You know. Clay Collins: All that stuff and tracking their behavior before you even have an email address or some sort of identifier.

So while they're anonymous users onto So all this sort of post-purchase information and stitching together a unified customer timeline of everything they did across this timeline. And I saw the same thing happening in the crypto space, again with lots of consolidation in data.

At first there was just a handful of exchanges that had most of the volume and then over time, that data being more and more distributed. And hearing from developers that every time they add a new integration to the system, it made the system exponentially more complex because they had to deal with these different systems going up and down in the interaction between systems and maintaining the integrations and all that. Clay Collins: So we are not a blockchain company.

We're not issuing a token. This is an API business. This is a really kind of "boring business", but I think that's kind of in my DNA. I'm a product person and I'm in this for the long haul. And it's kind of these companies that other people find boring, I find immensely interesting. Almost these online utility companies that charge on a metered basis, that's kind of my sweet spot and where I derive the most amount of interest. And I think the opportunity for us is that these are often things that most people just aren't interested in because they find them to boring.

And there's a lot of What do you You probably know the term for this, but like where degradation and data over time. So I like to use the example of metal just 'cause it's one I remember of being listed on Bittrex and then listed on Binance later and then de-listed on Bittrex, but it's still on Binance. And this is only over the course of whatever the last year that it's existed. We have no idea how this data might happen for an open source Brian Krogsgard: So I've seen people I say metal because that's the example I know where it has this history of Bittrex and it was way higher than it ever showed on Binance and I've seen people show a chart of metal on Binance and they're like, "Wow.

This thing is so destroyed, like it's so far off the top. But people are essentially lacking information to then make a decision because they don't have all of that aggregated.

So one of the things that y'all do, because you're pulling it from Bittrex and Binance, you're piling that into your global average over time and you're essentially providing data security for this asset and every other. For as long as you exist, you have that central source of truth if someone can use for making decisions. Clay Collins: Yep. And you know, one question we get from folks who don't spend a lot of time looking at data is, "Doesn't QuidMarket cap have this data?

Don't other sites like maybe Live Coin Watch have this data? They don't have candlestick data. For the most part, those services are just ingesting live tickers as the data comes in. They don't have historical trade data. They don't have the kind of data that a real trader would want to observe if they're going to create a bot for example. They may have I've actually poked around several of the APIs that are out there.

CoinMarketCap in particular, if you're building something really baseline where you're okay being somewhat right limited and you're gonna go cash all that, you can get stuff like 24 hour volume on a coin or you can get like current price or the percentage of the supply that's out, stuff like that.

But getting detailed data of everything that's happened over the past or lifetime of the coin, like several years sometimes, it gets a lot more challenging with anything. And then also just the quirks between all the dIfferent exchanges and everything that they support, and that seems to be kind of where y'all are attacking this.

So I'm super interested in this, but what I am What is hard to figure out is where the heck are you gonna make money and why are you doing this 'cause the Everything you do on nomics. I'm not necessarily trading based on what you have there. So where do you start to make money? Who do What kind of people do you charge if I can build something like nomics.

Clay Collins They're mostly institutional traders, quantitative hedge funds. Folks like that. What they're paying for is the raw trade data. When you want every individual trade, then you have to pay us or if you want some custom integrations or if you want SLAs and high level support or you want us to do some custom development work for you-.

You're saying you'll be up We don't persist the last candle if their API is down even though they're doing it. We'll just mark it as a zero and then we'll backfill it. If you're just consuming the live data feeds, they don't repair their data. We go back in and we get after the fact. Those are the folks that pay us. What that allows you to do is it allows you to create your own candles. If you decide you want 38 second candles, you can do it because you have the raw trades.

You can construct everything. Something that some folks want are like volume candles. They don't want candles based on like every hour or every four hours. They want million dollar candles. Actually they're doing a lot of the stuff that they won't even tell us.

Clay Collins: I'm a product person, so when someone buys our product, I'll go in and ask them, "What are you doing with this data? Sometimes we get a little insight when we do onsite visits and stuff like that. Pretty cheap in the scheme of things given the size of folk's data budgets. We'll probably move to a metered plan in the future. Brian Krogsgard: Okay. What would a metered plan look like? Would that be from there and higher or lower the bar?

Clay Collins: It would be like it's just sort of pay as you go. Ala carte. If you want to make a lot more calls, then you'll pay for those additional exposure to data. Brian Krogsgard: How do you bring exchanges on to participate to this? We've got about a dozen. The reason why we only have a dozen right now versus having a lot more is for kicking things off, we only wanted to work with exchanges that give us raw trade data. That allows us to calculate our own candles versus us believing their candles.

We've just found fraud. I can talk about that for a second. I'm not going to name an exchange, but the kind of fraud that we see most frequently occurring is when trades happen like far above the spot price.

You've got the bid ask spread. You've got the spot price, which would be a market order. It would be the bid jump way across the ask and purchase something like way over here. Clay Collins: So if you see those charts it's like jumping across the gap. So they'll be really paying some absurd amount for bitcoin, or whatever the crypto asset is, but buying a tiny amount of it at some insane price, and we're like there's no way an order book should let this happen.

So that's what we see most frequently. Brian Krogsgard: I've seen that specifically when people list a coin. They do that weird stuff and you see the massive first bar for some unknown reason.

Then two other scenarios I've seen, one was when Binance had the Syscoin hack and shenanigans that they did recently, someone stole 11 Syscoin for 96 BTC each.

I don't know if they skipped through the entire order book, like if it was just thin so that they spiked it to that level or what. But then the other scenario that I've heard that's fascinating to me is sometimes you can do that through exchange APIs because a lot of times the way you show an order book in a RESTful API is actually it shows every single one and then you can pluck the individual order.

Brian Krogsgard: So it allows you to essentially skip the order book, whereas typically a limit order's going to choose the lowest one or a market order is going to pull from the bottom or whatever. But I've heard there's some exchanges where they have funkiness in their API that would also allow something like that. If you have really thin markets and you put in a market order then it could just be that it blew past all the sell orders and jumped to some super high price.

But I can see what you're talking about with the APIs. You can pluck a specific order, although I don't know why someone would do that. That would just make no sense. So it could just be a crappy programmer somewhere.

But I don't know why a crappy programmer at a hedge fund is buying Syscoin for several bitcoin each. I just can't see any-. Brian Krogsgard: Yeah, I think in that example it was something related to the hack that they had and it was just a hot mess. Brian Krogsgard: I am curious. Y'all have a ton of data between the pricing data, candle data, exchange rates I'm just looking through some of your documentation right now.

Since you came from a marketing background, how did you even know like here's the data that we need to put into this API? How do you know what to provide and how to build it? Clay Collins: Yeah, so I'm a product person first and foremost.

So we get it by talking with customers. But we're also traders ourselves. So we know it from that perspective and we create stuff that we want to dog food ourselves. It's really about talking to customers a lot, doing stuff like we did with you on Twitter where you asked for a feature and like okay, we're going to build it. Or when we're talking to customers sometimes they'll say "Hey, we want this, but in order for this to really work for us we need you to add this additional thing.

Clay Collins: So it's just about talking with the customers all the time and I'm on the phone multiple times per week with institutional traders, developers and trying to learn everything I can about making a solid product.

I think kind of the DNA you have to have to make this kind of product is very different from the average product in this space. There's a lot of hackathon developers. There's a lot of kind of young dudes in their 20s spitting stuff up over the weekend. And to create a data product and a data platform I think it requires a certain level of discipline. So every single line of code has a unit test that covers that code.

Brian Krogsgard: Which means, for non-programmers, that means that what he says is going to happen has been tested via a whole nother slate of programming tools to verify that that's what happens, because he said it was going to happen. I don't know if that described that well. Clay Collins: Yeah, we have just as much code testing the app, as the app itself. Which means that myself as a non-developer, my CTO or someone else on the team will often send me a version of the app and I'll log into GitHub and deploy to production without anyone manually testing it.

So it's just a certain level of rigor. It's not something that most people have the stomach for because it's slower at first, but it pays off in spades down the road. Brian Krogsgard: Let's take a break, say thank you to our partner for this episode, Delta. Go ledgerstatus.

This is the best way to track your portfolio in crypto, bar none, guaranteed. And you know they've got some great new features. The last two releases have just been chock full of stuff. Live order books and depth charts, number one on the request list for people that I've talked to who said that they like Delta but they want more.

That's the biggest thing they've wanted. You've got that now. Brian Krogsgard: I think they support like a dozen exchanges so that you can see the actual order book, the depth charts, recent trades, all that stuff, right there in the app.

It's really great. They've just released portfolio analytics as well and I've thought this was really cool because I can go back and it'll actually tell me, if I'm a pro user it tells me even more, but it tells me stuff like what exchange are my coins on or what wallet is it in and it gives me these really nice graphs with all of that information, with a lot of analytical data.

It also even tells me what's a good trade or a bad trade. So if I sold something and it's gone down since then it'll tell me hey that was a good sell because it's gone down since then. Brian Krogsgard: It gives you some insights on your past decision making to let you know if you've done a good thing or a bad thing with that trade. Just give you a little more information about your trading and so that you can learn more to be a better trader.

Brian Krogsgard: Delta's really awesome. They're always working on cool stuff. Somebody may be listening to this and they might just say okay, so you want to provide data for hedge funds or for traders or people that want to build something like nomics. You have to be dreaming up more that this will be, in terms of the entire market, beyond a whole bunch of weird crypto assets that most should die.

Other than Bitcoin, Ethereum, and some large caps, do we really need this data? What else do you imagine in terms of being able to fit into your ecosystem? You have a grand vision of the future it seems. Clay Collins: Yeah, totally, totally. There's a couple of functions that we want to serve.

One is want to be like the internet archive of the new financial system. So archiving all of these dead coins, all of these markets that have expired, we want to tell the story and the history of what was happening when all of this started to come onto the scene. I think a second thing is that Perhaps this is overkill for what we have right now, but what we're intending to build is the data backbone for the new financial world, for the open financial system.

Clay Collins: And we take that very seriously. Also, the think right now there's not a lot of data. Perhaps there is. We've indexed billions of trades.

And multiple versions of local bitcoins that are reporting their data. Then OTC desks. And then add to that security token exchanges. Clay Collins: So imagine someday every single local coffee shop, pizza shop, anyone who wants to fundraise in this way, every single building in your city has a token and that token is perhaps traded on some kind of local exchange, there's just going to be an explosion of exchanges. And then add to that order book data. So data for orders that haven't been filled or have been canceled or maybe the order's been placed and that order converts to an actual trade and then add to that blockchain data and you have a huge undertaking in terms of-.

Brian Krogsgard: And that's all underlying physical product. That's the asset itself. That doesn't even get into a future where there's derivative products or futures or options. There's a whole nother set of trades and orders and everything. So y'all want to support all of that someday right? Clay Collins: Oh, no, and we are. And we have specs to handle that right now. So if you're from a blockchain project, if you're from an exchange, if you're from an OTC desk and you want to integrate your data with us, let us know.

We have specs for you to write to. If you can stand up three endpoints, pretty simple endpoints, we can give you a heck of a lot of exposure. So yeah, we're doing all of that and then add to that different indexes.

So each of those bots are going to have their own rankings. There's quite a future. Brian Krogsgard: This seems like an exponential explosion of data that's going to be on your ecosystem. How are you looking to be able to scale that? Like is this built on just a regular old database? I mean what's this look like? Clay Collins: So kind of the latest is using Kafka and Cassandra and that's what we're building on. We're not using Microsoft Access.

Clay Collins: Kind of these large nonrelationable wide column store databases that can handle trillions upon trillions of data points. That's how you got to do it. Brian Krogsgard: And then I don't want to get too much in the weeds. There's no rate limiting. So we cache the hell out of our endpoints. So you can hit us as hard as you want. We don't care. Go nuts. A lot of people charge quite a bit for these sort of uncapped non rate limited APIs, but yeah we won't rate limit.

That's another thing that no one else will do that we do is we don't rate limit. Brian Krogsgard: And you're just assuming either that it's worth eating the cost for now or the cost is somewhat nominal for now. Do you expect your pay customers will be able to absorb that function for the long haul? Clay Collins: So a couple things, one, we're really good at caching. Second, we just want to win in the short term.

So we want people to feel comfortable using us and third, I'm funding this myself. In the long term, the way we're modeled the big cost is not that we're not rate limiting it here, it's engineers. Brian Krogsgard: Right. We probably could have led with this but I think people have probably gotten the picture by now, but this is a centralized business with a open API and there's no token.

There's none of that stuff. You're not a crypto project. Unless someday maybe you tokenize nomics. But this is a normal old business, not like a blockchain project itself. It's not token based or anything like that. Clay Collins: Right. Yeah, so we're using centralized databases. We're a centralized company. I'm a big believer in that not everything needs to be decentralized or run on a blockchain and I actually think that what we're doing is kind of a horrible candidate for the blockchain.

It's a terrible blockchain use case. You want millisecond response times on APIs. Yeah, you probably don't want to use a blockchain. So yeah, at some point maybe we'll tokenize equity of the company and let people buy a piece of what we're doing. But for now this is kind of We want to be really good at the boring basics. And that's what we're focused on. Brian Krogsgard: In addition to all of this you're doing a podcast called Flippening.

I just listened to a three part series that y'all put out about security tokens and probably tripled my knowledge of not only I kind of had an idea of what security tokens potential was, but more about who are the players within the security token landscape and what do they envision and how do they differ from each other. So people might hear of Polymath because it has a token, but people should also be aware of something like Harbor and they provide a different type of service than what poly does.

Bruce Fenton was on your show, who's a big Ravencoin guy. Brian Krogsgard: And they're going to have stuff on top of a platform on Ravencoin, but he created a security token for his company on Counterparty through bitcoin. There's already all these tools for security tokens, so you just did this huge deep dive, why are you spending I thought about how much time Clay must have spent making this podcast, because each episode's got half a dozen guests, edited down into the questions.

How much time are you spending on this stuff and why? What's your basis for doing such an in depth series like that? Clay Collins: All in, that was at least hours. I'm embarrassed how much time that series took. Yeah, so that was just one of these stupid ideas where I was like I want to do an audio documentary. I had heard a really good audio documentary about cryptocurrencies and there was a part of me as a product person that respects the craftsmanship that said to myself I want to create something that is like planet money level content for the cryptocurrency space about security tokens.

Clay Collins: And kind of the genesis of that was I interviewed one company. I interviewed Polymath about security tokens and I got just this fraction of a picture of what was happening and then I realized there's exchanges, and there are issuers, and there were just so many regulatory bodies and there was so many different components to this. Because there's already a pretty mature financial system that deals with securities already, so I couldn't do just one interview.

So I started booking all these interviews and then I realized that it was too late. Once I interviewed the people now I had a commitment to publish them, but it didn't make sense to publish all these interviews by themselves because they really didn't stand on their own. I needed to weave a narrative through it and then I need to write a narrative, which means I need-. Clay Collins: -storyboard out the whole thing. It was really a pain in the ass, but the interesting thing is, after I finished that, I figured out what my workflow was for creating these, and I've realized I kind of figured out how I could do one in a third of the time next time, so I'm probably going to be doing another stupid one here in the future.

Brian Krogsgard: So, is the purpose behind these that you just want to share what you're learning and traditional podcast stuff? Or is this marketing for Nomics? Clay Collins: Yeah, it's marketing for Nomics. It's really the only podcast for institutional crypto-investors.

There's no podcast that has more listenership and more coverage from the institutional crowd than Flippening. That's exactly who our target audience is. Everyone who's paid for the API so far has [inaudible ] the podcast. Clay Collins: Because I don't have a big content marketing team, we can't churn out a bunch of thought pieces or tutorials. There's just me. If I can do one thing that's going to attract the kind of audience that I want to get, what can I do?

It was create this podcast because I started evaluating how much time does CoinDesk spend to put on Consensus or Consensus Invest? And it's millions of dollars. I've thrown big events before. Clay Collins: Yeah, and they make millions of dollars too.

But having come from the event business, I bet they're just doing better than break even. That's my prediction. I could be completely wrong, but I bet they're just doing better, even with how it's monetized. I bet you they're just doing a little bit better than break even. In New York, in Times Square, that's my prediction. Brian Krogsgard: Yeah, I've run small events, and it's enormous energy and very little money is what it ends up as most of the time.

Yeah, so I was doing the stats on my podcast, and every single episode was getting about 50, downloads. I was like, "There was 12, people at Consensus Invest," so I bet I'm getting just as much coverage with that podcast from this very niche institutional investor crowd.

The ROI for me really made sense. Even though it's a pain in the ass that I love to do, I'm probably going to still continue doing it. Brian Krogsgard: Who do you consider an institutional investor in the space?

What's an institutional investor to you? Clay Collins: Yeah, so I define institutional as someone who raises money from other parties to invest it on their behalf. Clay Collins: Usually they've filed as a sort of a Reg D fund or they're usually regulated in some way, so they're not just playing with their own money. A family office is technically not an institutional investor, but some of these family offices have billions under management, so it's kind of like they walk like a duck, they talk like a duck, and they have that level of rigor to what they do.

They've got an entire staff and stuff. Yeah, institutional investors are-. Brian Krogsgard: What are some of the big lessons that you've learned, based on the people you've talked to, in terms of what's most concerning to an institutional investor?

And let's level that up, the higher-end ones. For instance, I know custody is an issue for real institutional investors, whereas, for a lot of people with a little less on the line, they can kind of manage custody in-house. But if you're a regulated entity, custody becomes significantly more important. What kind of lessons for those types of people do you think you've been able to come up with? Clay Collins: Yeah, so custody is definitely the big one. That's where good OTC desks come in.

You place a phone call, you arrange the price ahead of time, and then you do the trade. OTC desks and clearinghouses are probably the next point of concern. Clay Collins: And then it's just good projects. I mean, it's hard for a lot of these folks to find coins other than Bitcoin and Ethereum that have enough liquidity and market depth for them to feel comfortable and just history. Brian Krogsgard: Do you think people that come from traditional markets are having a hard time grasping the mix of speculation versus fundamental value in projects?

Because I think one of the things I'm seeing is a lot of stuff is way down to where, if this was a traditional market where the market is fairly efficient and understanding what pricing is and what works, they'd look like deals, right? I've gone through this lesson myself as a trader because stuff just doesn't-. Do you think it's a learning curve for people trying to learn how to invest in crypto versus investing in the real world, if you will? That's a good question. I think everyone's focused on the fact that these things are tokens and kind of forgetting about the real world analogy.

A lot of these hedge funds really aren't doing forex trades, but in a lot of ways, that's what Bitcoin coin is. It's a forex thing. There's no underlying value. You're placing a bet on the network and the utility value of the coin, so it's really hard to evaluate what it is because it's not like a security where there's this underlying asset, and then you can try and figure out what that underlying asset is worth. Clay Collins: And then with things like Filecoin and crypto commodities, that just looks a lot like VC.

You're buying something based on the future value of that. But the hard thing there with crypto commodities like Filecoin is it doesn't matter how much utility value exists. There's a lot of hard drive space in the world, so just because it's tokenized doesn't mean that all the sudden this thing is worth more. Clay Collins: I think folks in general need to not focus as much on the fact that it's a token and the whole thing is some new asset class. I don't think of this as a new asset class.

I think what's happening is tokenized versions of the analogous thing that exists in the real world, and there's so many different versions of that. There's tokenized securities that represent equity in a company. There's this new financial system.

There's true cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. There's Ethereum, which is this I couldn't even tell you. Brian Krogsgard: I was about to ask, how would you give an analogy for a protocol or a network with a value?

Because in the web or whatever, open-source software, historically we don't really assign monetary value directly to the platform, a protocol, an API, whatever.

But that's what we're doing in crypto. Brian Krogsgard: That one, I agree with you completely, even though I've always said this is a whole new asset class. I agree with you that, at the base layer, it's a business represented by a token or whatever else, except for this protocol side of things. It's weird for me, and I guess maybe that's why the market's inefficient and why we're seeing these drastic swings is because we're trying to figure out what is something like the 0x protocol worth?

And we have this ability to put a monetary value on them. I mean, I think a lot of times a monetary value is just that the greater fool is going to come on and buy it for more, and that is the [inaudible ] of the token. Brian Krogsgard: Musical chairs is not a game I want to play, but I agree, it does seem like we're all playing it.

We're just hoping that some other sucker is going to be the one left without a chair. I go to Vegas every once in a while. Why don't you know what you're doing? I think there's something real about Bitcoin. I think there's something real about Ethereum. I think something that is not discussed enough with regards to Ethereum is the fact that there's these compound or kind of second-order network effects that occur.

Everyone talks about the network effects of Bitcoin. It's like Visa: the more people that accept Visa, the more valuable Visa is.

Same with phones. Owning a phone makes owning a phone more valuable to everyone, every time one is purchased. Or Facebook. I think people generally get network effects. Clay Collins: There's another effect at play: the Lindy effect, which is just the value of something that doesn't break increases with every unit of time that it continues to not break. We develop more trust in the system. That's the Lindy effect. Clay Collins: But I think second order network effects occur with platforms like Ethereum, where Ether itself has network effects, but then built on top of Ethereum are these additional tokens that themselves have network effects.

I really think there's something to that. There's just so much developer activity on top of Ethereum. The transaction volume is there. The combined long-tail of the network effects of the tokens built on Ethereum is just truly outstanding, where none of them individually on their own maybe have world-changing network effects just yet.

But the cumulative power makes Ethereum extremely defensible. Clay Collins: I'm not a philosopher or an economist, and I don't spend all my time writing up Medium posts about this, but there's something really, really powerful about what's happening with Ethereum. I don't know if necessarily all that accrues to the token or how this all plays out, but I think there's something special happening. Brian Krogsgard: So, network effects, to me, make sense. I come from open-source software, so I understand the power of "Hey, other people use this, so I'm going to use this.

Other people use this. I'm going to use this. I can find developers who build on this," etc. It's a known thing. I get it, and I understand it, and it makes sense. To me, it's kind of analogous to JavaScript, right? JavaScript kind of is at the base of web programming, and then you have all these frameworks built on top of it, like Angular and React and Aurelia. The returned JSON is dictionary with elements for each currency. Each currency has up to three key-value pairs: 24h, 7d and 30d.

This will return an array with elements for each market. Returned fields per market are:. Trade data is available as CSV, delayed by approx.

It will return the most recent trades. You can use the start parameter to specify an earlier unix timestamp in order to retrieve older data. This service is strictly for personal use. We are interested in feedback! Email info bitcoincharts. Bitcoin Charts. Blocks Total BTC Difficulty Estimated in 1 blks.

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Our Cryptocurrency and Bitcoin API is a lightning fast REST API that aspires to be the data backbone for developers and professional cryptoinvestors. Bitcoin Charts API: Bitcoin Market Data API - Blockchain Blockchain Charts & Statistics API The Blockchain Charts & Statistics API provides a simple interface to programmatically interact with the charts and statistics displayed on bitmoneylab.de Use CoinMarketCap's free crypto API to get the best, most accurate real-time, historical cryptocurrency and exchange trade data for Bitcoin, Ethereum and more. Tags:Melbourne bitcoin deposit, Neteller bitcoin deposit declined, Whats bitcoin trading at now, Tradedevil bitcoin, Can i buy bitcoin through etrade

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